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Sell Your Cask of Glenugie Whisky

Sell your Cask of Glenugie Whisky with Mark Littler

Glenugie Cask Values & Valuations 

In the words of Jim Murray “…this distillery never seems to let you down. The rule of thumb is: find a bottle of Glenugie and you’ll find liquid gold.”  Therefore if you own a cask of Glenugie you have found the fountain of youth!

Sadly very few casks of Glenugie are in private hands, so the chances may be slim.  When a cask of Glenugie does appear on the market people get very excited and casks can exchange for very high sums of money.  Of course the number of litres of alcohol (RLA) and the strength (ABV) need to be high for the cask to be considered exceptional.

We specialise in the sale of Glenugie casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Glenugie casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand.  Bourbon casks (quite common at Glenugie) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of Glenugie whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

How to sell your cask of Glenugie whisky

In the words of Jim Murray “…this distillery never seems to let you down. The rule of thumb is: find a bottle of Glenugie and you’ll find liquid gold.”  Therefore if you own a cask of Glenugie you have found the fountain of youth!

Sadly very few casks of Glenugie are in private hands, so the chances may be slim.  When a cask of Glenugie does appear on the market people get very excited and casks can exchange for very high sums of money.  Of course the number of litres of alcohol (RLA) and the strength (ABV) need to be high for the cask to be considered exceptional.

We specialise in the brokerage of Glenugie casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Glenugie casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand.  Bourbon casks (quite common at Glenugie) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

What is my cask of Glenugie worth?

In order to provide you with an accurate valuation please provide as much of the below information as you can. There is more information about each section below the form.

Cask Whisky Valuation Form

The History of the Glenugie Distillery

At one time, the Glenugie Distillery was the most easterly of its kind in Scotland. It was also one of 4 distilleries which have been lost on the Peterhead area, a district renowned for fishing and the two harbours which were designed by well-known architects John Smeaton and Thomas Telford. Once a producer of single malt whisky, the Glenugie Distillery had a sporadic operation between 1831 and 1983, with a string of owners. It finally shut its doors in 1983 – the end to a 150-year-old chapter of failures and set backs.

First established in 1831, the Glenugie Distillery was founded by Donald McLeod & Co Ltd under the original name Invernettie. Simon Forbes then bought the distillery in 1884 and had some success, operating it until 1915. Although the distillery remained silent for the majority of the First World War, it did reopen for a brief period between 1923 and 1924 under the name Glenugie Distillery Ltd. However once more, it fell silent from 1925 until 1937 when Seager Evans and Co Ltd reopened it again.

In 1956, the distillery was bought by Scheney International at which time the decision was made to improve its equipment. This led to an oil system being installed in place of the original coal fired boiler, and also a new pair of stills that had condensers were introduced thus doubling production. This doubling of production levels led to excessive strain on the workshop and as a result, the decision was taken to cease malting on the site, converting the malthouse into a warehouse space.

Seager Evans took a new name in 1970, becoming Long John International, and Whitbread bought their business in 1975. Still Glenugie continued to operate, however times were changing for Scottish whisky. The 1980s was a difficult time for whisky production in Scotland as there was excessive competition in the market and many distilleries fell prey to the difficult financial times. Glenugie Distillery was one of the unlucky distilleries which could not continue after 1983. It joined the other dozen or so single malt distilleries which closed in the same year.

Dismantling of the distillery followed, and its premises were then taken over by the Score Group Plc. They constructed workshops on the site, although the Glenugie brand name still exists and is currently owned by the Chivas Brothers.