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Sell Your Cask of Bladnoch Whisky

Sell your Cask of Bladnoch Whisky with Mark Littler

Bladnoch cask  valuations

Bladnoch is another distillery that has battled through some tough times.  Like many other distilleries, the sale of casks to the public was one was of raising funds in the short term while production increased and their stocks of casks matured.

A number of Bladnoch casks were also made available following the collapse of the distillery in 2014 and many casks appeared for sale on various forums online.  It is well worth checking the original terms relating to your cask of Bladnoch as it has been known for some to contain a caveat that if re-sold the  Bladnoch name cannot be associated with the cask. 

We specialise in the sale of Bladnoch casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Bladnoch casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand.  Bourbon casks (not as common at Bladnoch) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but still sell very well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of Bladnoch whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation valuation for your cask of Bladnoch whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

Sell your Cask of Bladnoch Whisky with Mark Littler

How to sell a cask of Bladnoch whisky

Bladnoch is another distillery that has battled through some tough times.  Like many other distilleries, the sale of casks to the public was one was of raising funds in the short term while production increased and their stocks of casks matured.

A number of Bladnoch casks were also made available following the collapse of the distillery in 2014 and many casks appeared for sale on various forums online.  It is well worth checking the original terms relating to your cask of Bladnoch as it has been known for some to contain a caveat that if re-sold the  Bladnoch name cannot be associated with the cask. 

We specialise in the sale of Bladnoch casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Bladnoch casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand.  Bourbon casks (not as common at Bladnoch) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but still sell very well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

What is my cask of Bladnoch whisky worth?

Cask Whisky Valuation Form

Bladnoch Whisky History

Bladnoch Distillery is located in the south west of Scotland and is one of only six Lowland distilleries still to be in operation today. Found in Bladnoch near Wigtown in Dumfries and Galloway, this distillery is on the River Bladnoch’s banks and is Scotland’s most southern distillery.

Founded in 1817 by Thomas and John McClelland, the distillery produced 131,640 litres of whisky between 1823 and 1826, with an average of 32,910 litres every year. During 1826 to 1827, this total had increased to 44,520 litres a year.

By the middle of the 1800s, Bladnoch Distillery was employing 20 workers to turn 16,000 bushels of barley every year into spirit. The distillery was then modernised and enlarged in 1878 to handle the increased demand for whisky and the rise in production levels. By the year 1887, the distillery’s site covered 2 acres, and another 50 acres was being farmed by the distillery’s proprietor, the nephew and son of its founders, and its output had increased considerably to 230,000 litres every year.

In the 1890s, however, the distilling business hit hard times, possibly because of the increase in excise duty, the growth of temperance movements or even because the amount of barley being produced nationwide had reduced. Galloway’s other distilleries ended up closing their doors, however Bladnoch managed to weather the storm.

From 1911 – 1937, the distillery was owned by an Irish company, Wm Dunville & Co Ltd, and, although whisky produced temporarily ceased when World War II broke out, malt was produced continuously until 1949 at which time the distillery shut up shop.

In 1957, the distillery reopened once more with a new owner, beginning whisky production again. There were several owners in charge of operations until Bell’s took over operations in 1983 and put a programme of computerisation and modernisation in place. Bell’s was taken over by the United Distillers Group in 1987 and soon, the weekly production rate increased to more than 36,000 litres. However, in 1993, the distillery was mothballed, but was discovered a year later by Raymond Armstrong, an Irishman who was holidaying in the area. He replaced the old equipment and plant and reopened the distillery for production in 2000.

However, troubled times weren’t over for the distillery, and it went into liquidation in 2014. It was bought again in 2015 by David Prior, an Australian entrepreneur and Bladnoch has now reopened and is producing fine whisky again.

Bladnoch Whisky History

Bladnoch Distillery is located in the south west of Scotland and is one of only six Lowland distilleries still to be in operation today. Found in Bladnoch near Wigtown in Dumfries and Galloway, this distillery is on the River Bladnoch’s banks and is Scotland’s most southern distillery.

Founded in 1817 by Thomas and John McClelland, the distillery produced 131,640 litres of whisky between 1823 and 1826, with an average of 32,910 litres every year. During 1826 to 1827, this total had increased to 44,520 litres a year.

By the middle of the 1800s, Bladnoch Distillery was employing 20 workers to turn 16,000 bushels of barley every year into spirit. The distillery was then modernised and enlarged in 1878 to handle the increased demand for whisky and the rise in production levels. By the year 1887, the distillery’s site covered 2 acres, and another 50 acres was being farmed by the distillery’s proprietor, the nephew and son of its founders, and its output had increased considerably to 230,000 litres every year.

In the 1890s, however, the distilling business hit hard times, possibly because of the increase in excise duty, the growth of temperance movements or even because the amount of barley being produced nationwide had reduced. Galloway’s other distilleries ended up closing their doors, however Bladnoch managed to weather the storm.

From 1911 – 1937, the distillery was owned by an Irish company, Wm Dunville & Co Ltd, and, although whisky produced temporarily ceased when World War II broke out, malt was produced continuously until 1949 at which time the distillery shut up shop.

In 1957, the distillery reopened once more with a new owner, beginning whisky production again. There were several owners in charge of operations until Bell’s took over operations in 1983 and put a programme of computerisation and modernisation in place. Bell’s was taken over by the United Distillers Group in 1987 and soon, the weekly production rate increased to more than 36,000 litres. However, in 1993, the distillery was mothballed, but was discovered a year later by Raymond Armstrong, an Irishman who was holidaying in the area. He replaced the old equipment and plant and reopened the distillery for production in 2000.

However, troubled times weren’t over for the distillery, and it went into liquidation in 2014. It was bought again in 2015 by David Prior, an Australian entrepreneur and Bladnoch has now reopened and is producing fine whisky again.