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Sell Your Cask of Brora Whisky

Sell your Cask of Brora Whisky with Mark Littler

Brora Cask Values & Valuations 

Brora is a very sought after single malt and very few casks remain in private ownership.  As the distillery closed in 1983, any remaining casks of Brora are at least 35 years old.

If you own a cask of Brora and the cask appears healthy (with a good ABV and RLA) then you are due for a very considerable windfall.  However, given the minimum age of casks of Brora, there is a high chance your cask might fall below the 40% minimum ABV required to call a spirit whisky.  We would strongly recommend getting an annual regauge of your cask of Brora even if you are not considering selling in order to monitor the health of your very rare and very sought after cask!

We specialise in the brokerage of Brora casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Brora casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand.  Bourbon casks (quite common at Brora ) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well. 

If you would like to know the value of your Brora cask use the form below to get in touch.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of Brora whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

How to sell your cask of XXX whisky

Brora is a very sought after single malt and very few casks remain in private ownership.  As the distillery closed in 1983, any remaining casks of Brora are at least 35 years old.

If you own a cask of Brora and the cask appears healthy (with a good ABV and RLA) then you are due for a very considerable windfall.  However, given the minimum age of casks of Brora, there is a high chance your cask might fall below the 40% minimum ABV required to call a spirit whisky.  We would strongly recommend getting an annual regauge of your cask of Brora even if you are not considering selling in order to monitor the health of your very rare and very sought after cask!

We specialise in the brokerage of Brora casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Brora casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand.  Bourbon casks (quite common at Brora ) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well. 

If you would like to know the value of your Brora cask use the form below to get in touch.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

What is my cask of Brora worth?

In order to provide you with an accurate valuation please provide as much of the below information as you can. There is more information about each section below the form.

Cask Whisky Valuation Form

The History of the Brora Distillery

Once known as Clynelish, Brora Distillery is one of the Clearance Distilleries of Scotland, constructed by the Marquis of Stafford in 1819 who, together with his wife, was responsible for some of the Highlands’ most brutal forced evictions that resulting in tenants being expelled from their homes and sent overseas. The people who end up in the new Brora settlement worked in one of the Duke’s business enterprises and one of these was whisky distilling.

It took the Brora Distillery some time to become established, and it passed through several lessees until finally George Lawson took over operations. Between him and his sons, the plant would stay in the Lawson family’s hands until 1896 when James Ainslie, a Glasgow blender, purchased it. In 1912, Ainslie went bankrupt and DCL and Risk took shares in the company, with John Walker and Sons following suit in 1916. In 1925, Risk was bought out and Walker joined DCL with DCL taking over the control of the distillery in 1930, taking full responsibility for its operations until the time that it closed.

Following World War II, the Brora Distillery increased its capacity considerably due to an increased demand for blends among a number of major whisky producers. By the time 1967 had rolled around, its popularity had become so great that it was decided that a new bigger distillery should be constructed next to the original buildings. Although the old distillery shut for a year, its doors reopened in 1969 with production being recommenced in the same year.

While the name of the distillery was originally Clynelish, its name had to be changed to Brora in 1975 following a legislation change which banned any two distilleries from having the same name, and during the period 1972-74 heavily peated malt was produced here while the Caol Ila distillery was undergoing a rebuild. However, the majority of the whisky made here after 1973 was a lightly peated Highland variety.

The distillery did not always operate at full capacity furing the period between 1969 and the time that it closed, and it finally shut down for good in 1983. Although rumours persisted about the possibility of the Brora Distillery reopening, these proved to be unfounded until the October of 2017 when plans were revealed to reopen the distillery. Assuming planning permission is granted, the site is due to reopen and begin operations again by 2020.