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Sell Your Cask of Littlemill Whisky

Sell your Cask of Littlemill Whisky with Mark Littler

Littlemill Cask Values & Valuations 

Littlemill casks are arguably the most common of all the silent or closed distilleries.  However, casks of ANY silent or closed distillery command a significant premium and this is the case for Littlemill.

Littlemill also was a Lowland distillery, of which there were very few (most were grain distilleries).  This boosts the price of Littlemill casks even further, so if you have a cask of Littlemill you are due a significant windfall.

We specialise in the brokerage of Littlemill casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Littlemill casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand. Bourbon casks (quite common at Littlemill ) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of Littlemill whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

How to sell your cask of Littlemill whisky

Littlemill casks are arguably the most common of all the silent or closed distilleries.  However, casks of ANY silent or closed distillery command a significant premium and this is the case for Littlemill.

Littlemill also was a Lowland distillery, of which there were very few (most were grain distilleries).  This boosts the price of Littlemill casks even further, so if you have a cask of Littlemill you are due a significant windfall.

We specialise in the brokerage of Littlemill casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Littlemill casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand. Bourbon casks (quite common at Littlemill ) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

What is my cask of Littlemill worth?

In order to provide you with an accurate valuation please provide as much of the below information as you can. There is more information about each section below the form.

Cask Whisky Valuation Form

The History of the Littlemill Distillery

The Littlemill Distillery was located on the border between the Highlands and the Lowlands, and its whisky products were classified generally as Lowlands whisky. Although the origins of this distillery are uncertain, it was certainly mentioned in the purchase documents relating to the Auchentorlie Estate which was sold during the 1750s. Houses had been constructed during 1772 for the purpose of housing the customs and excise officers, and this is also the year that the Littlemill Distillery has claimed to have been founded, which, if this is genuinely the case, makes it Scotland’s oldest distillery.

In 1817, its ownership fell into the hands of Matthew Clark & Co, but after the passing of the 1823 Customs & Excise Act which allowed whisky to be distilled at a lower licence cost, its license passed into the name of Jane Macgregor until the year 1840 when the ownership went to one Hector Henderson, who was the founder of the Caol Ila distillery and a shareholder in the Campbeltown Distillery. In 1875, the owner at the time, Hay, expanded and rebuilt the distillery.

In 1929, the Littlemill distillery closed its doors for a few years, and it was not until 1931 that it was opened once more by Duncan Thomas. He brought new techniques to the distillery, using a Saladin box with a single kiln and two ventilation towers for malting, aluminium coated copper pot stills and rectifying columns rather than swan necks. He also switched production to a double distillation technique from a triple one.

Barton Distilling took over the distillery’s operations in 1971, and in 1982 they were bought out by Amalgamated Distilled Products. When this company became part of the Argyll Group two years later the distillery shut down, and although it was briefly reopened again in 1989, it only lasted until 1994. The distillery was finally dismantled in 1997 and its remains were destroyed by fire in 2004. The former site is now occupied by a housing estate.

During its period of operation, the Littlemill Distillery produced 3 types of whisky – one went by the name of Dumbuck and was a heavily peated variety, the second, named Dunglas was full bodied, while the third, Littlemill was a light lowland traditional variety. Both Dunglas and Dumbuck were discontinued at the time of the sale to Barton Distilling in 1971 leaving only the Littlemill whisky being produced until the disbanding of the operation.