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Sell Your Cask of Springbank ™ Whisky

Sell your Cask of Springbank ™ Whisky with Mark Littler

Springbank ™ cask valuations

Casks of Springbank ™ whisky were made available to the public in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s as a way to finance the distillery in the short term.  If you were fortunate enough to buy a cask at this time then you are almost certainly due a windfall. 

Fresh fill sherry casks could be bought for under £1,000 in the mid-1990’s from Springbank ™.  Depending of the ABV and remaining litres in the cask, that same cask could be worth over £20,000 in the current market. 

Don’t be deterred if you have had a low offer from the distillery; they have so much of their own stock their ‘buy back’ prices are often very low.  We can get you a much better price (sometimes over 500% more than the distillery offer!!) for your cask as we have a very wide network of buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Springbank ™ casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand.  Bourbon cask (not as common at Springbank ™) do not command the same premium as sherry casks sadly.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of Springbank ™ whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation valuation for your cask of Springbank ™ is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

Sell your Cask of Springbank ™ Whisky with Mark Littler

How to sell a cask of Springbank ™ whisky

Casks of Springbank ™ whisky were made available to the public in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s as a way to finance the distillery in the short term.  If you were fortunate enough to buy a cask at this time then you are almost certainly due a windfall. 

Fresh fill sherry casks could be bought for under £1,000 in the mid-1990’s from Springbank ™.  Depending of the ABV and remaining litres in the cask, that same cask could be worth over £20,000 in the current market. 

Don’t be deterred if you have had a low offer from the distillery; they have so much of their own stock their ‘buy back’ prices are often very low.  We can get you a much better price (sometimes over 500% more than the distillery offer!!) for your cask as we have a very wide network of buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Springbank ™ casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand.  Bourbon cask (not as common at Springbank ™) do not command the same premium as sherry casks sadly.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

What is my cask of Springbank ™ whisky worth?

Cask Whisky Valuation Form

The History of Springbank ™ whisky

Although the Springbank distillery wasn’t officially founded until the 1800s, it has a history that dates back to the 16th century. Campbeltown, Scotland, was known in that era as a centre for illegal whisky production and smuggling, and the Mitchell family, who were later responsible for founding the distillery, arrived in the town as settlers from the lowland areas. In 1927, Archibald Mitchell and, eventually his brother Hugh became partners at the Rieclachan Distillery in Campbeltown and in 1828, they officially founded the Springbank Distillery – Campbeltown’s 14th licensed distillery at that time.

During the 1830s, Archibald’s sons took ownership of the distillery and in 1838, Sprinbank’s™ profile had become so well recognised that John Walker of Kilmarnock bought no less than 118 gallons. By the turn of the 20th century, the public’s whisky preferences had changed, and so Sprinbank™ decided to alter their production methods, creating a lighter, less heavily peated whisky, which used coal instead of peat to dry the malt. As the years went by, many of the other distilleries in Campbeltown began to cut corners in order to meet the growing demand for whisky, resulting in their closure, and by the mid-1930s, only Glen Scotia and Springbank ™ were left in operation in the town.

During the 1980s, the whisky industry took another downtown, and many more distilleries shut their doors all over Scotland. However, Springbank ™ persevered in selling whisky, even though their production was sporadic. Luckily, the slump was shortlived, and in 1989, regular production was underway again, paving the way for Springbank’s ™ single malt’s reputation to take off worldwide during the 1990s. A run of high quality bottlings were released, cementing the reputation of the distillery as a producer of world class whiskies.

In 2008, Springbank ™ decided to take a 6-month break, halting its production so that new warehousing could be constructed. In 2009, however, the whisky-production process began once more, and in 2013, the distillery sold a bottle of 1919 50-year-old whisky to a whisky collector from China for an impressive £50,000.

Today, Springbank ™ is one of just three remaining distilleries still in operation around the Campbeltown area – a far cry from the region’s heyday when more than 30 distilleries were operating in the town. It remains the oldest family owned independent distillery in the whole of Scotland. The majority of its distillate is bottled as single malts, and a small amount is sold to blenders or used in one of the distillery’s own blended labels.

The History of Springbank whisky

Although the Springbank distillery wasn’t officially founded until the 1800s, it has a history that dates back to the 16th century. Campbeltown, Scotland, was known in that era as a centre for illegal whisky production and smuggling, and the Mitchell family, who were later responsible for founding the distillery, arrived in the town as settlers from the lowland areas. In 1927, Archibald Mitchell and, eventually his brother Hugh became partners at the Rieclachan Distillery in Campbeltown and in 1828, they officially founded the Springbank Distillery – Campbeltown’s 14th licensed distillery at that time.

During the 1830s, Archibald’s sons took ownership of the distillery and in 1838, Sprinbank’s profile had become so well recognised that John Walker of Kilmarnock bought no less than 118 gallons. By the turn of the 20th century, the public’s whisky preferences had changed, and so Sprinbank decided to alter their production methods, creating a lighter, less heavily peated whisky, which used coal instead of peat to dry the malt. As the years went by, many of the other distilleries in Campbeltown began to cut corners in order to meet the growing demand for whisky, resulting in their closure, and by the mid-1930s, only Glen Scotia and Springbank were left in operation in the town.

During the 1980s, the whisky industry took another downtown, and many more distilleries shut their doors all over Scotland. However, Springbank persevered in selling whisky, even though their production was sporadic. Luckily, the slump was shortlived, and in 1989, regular production was underway again, paving the way for Springbank’s single malt’s reputation to take off worldwide during the 1990s. A run of high quality bottlings were released, cementing the reputation of the distillery as a producer of world class whiskies.

In 2008, Springbank decided to take a 6-month break, halting its production so that new warehousing could be constructed. In 2009, however, the whisky-production process began once more, and in 2013, the distillery sold a bottle of 1919 50-year-old whisky to a whisky collector from China for an impressive £50,000.

Today, Springbank is one of just three remaining distilleries still in operation around the Campbeltown area – a far cry from the region’s heyday when more than 30 distilleries were operating in the town. It remains the oldest family owned independent distillery in the whole of Scotland. The majority of its distillate is bottled as single malts, and a small amount is sold to blenders or used in one of the distillery’s own blended labels.