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Sell Your Cask of St Magdalene Whisky

Sell your Cask of St Magdalene Whisky with Mark Littler

St Magdalene Cask Values & Valuations 

St Magdalene (also known as Linlithgow) casks are arguably the most sought-after of all the Lowland distilleries.  Sadly the distillery closed in 1983 and the buildings are now flats so there is no chance of it re-opening like Rosebank, Brora and Port Ellen.

Although the distillery had a capacity of around 200,000 gallons a year there were no official bottlings released by the distillery.  As such casks of St Magdalene (or Linlithgow) are very sought after and command very high prices.  As all casks are now 35 years old careful cask management is crucial to ensure your cask does not fall below the 40% ABV figure where the spirit can no longer be called whisky.

We specialise in the brokerage of St Magdalene casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable St Magdalene casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand. Bourbon casks (quite common at St Magdalene) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of St Magdalene whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

How to sell your cask of St Magdalene whisky

St Magdalene (also known as Linlithgow) casks are arguably the most sought-after of all the Lowland distilleries.  Sadly the distillery closed in 1983 and the buildings are now flats so there is no chance of it re-opening like Rosebank, Brora and Port Ellen.

Although the distillery had a capacity of around 200,000 gallons a year there were no official bottlings released by the distillery.  As such casks of St Magdalene (or Linlithgow) are very sought after and command very high prices.  As all casks are now 35 years old careful cask management is crucial to ensure your cask does not fall below the 40% ABV figure where the spirit can no longer be called whisky.

We specialise in the brokerage of St Magdalene casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable St Magdalene casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand. Bourbon casks (quite common at St Magdalene) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

What is my cask of St Magdalene worth?

In order to provide you with an accurate valuation please provide as much of the below information as you can. There is more information about each section below the form.

Cask Whisky Valuation Form

The History of the St Magdalene Distillery

St Magdalene distillery produced single malt whisky between 1798 and 1983. Originally, there were 5 distilleries in the Royal Burgh of Linlithgow, and while the St Magdalene Distillery was the longest lasting, in the end, even this distillery too has closed its doors.

Constructed in the mid-1700s by Sebastian Henderson, the purpose of St Magdalene distillery was to oppose the Bulzion distillery’s construction which had appeared on the scene a few years before. The land where the distillery was built were the St Magdalene’s Cross convent lands, and had been rented by Henderson from the Countess of Dalhousie.

Provost and distiller Adam Dawson, who was already operating the Bonnytoun Distillery adjacent to the site bought the St Magdalene distillery in 1798 and moved over his operation. His business grew rapidly, and the distillery absorbed the original site at Bonnytoun, spanning 10 acres altogether. In 1834 it moved to the St Magdalene site so it would be closer to the Union Canal. Before the existence of the distillery, the site on which it was built was variously a hospital, convent and a leper colony, and its name came from the name of the lazar house which stood on the site at one time in its past.

Dawson’s family owned the distillery until the early part of the 20th century, and by 1856 the St Magdalene site was able to produce 4000 gallons of whisky every week, employing 30 people. However, in 1912 after the market declined amid intense competition in the industry, the company went into liquidation following the untimely death of John Kellie Dawon who was only 43 and passed away from meningitis. This led to the business being bought by DCL and then licensed out to William Greer & Co.

In 1914 the St Magdalene distillery became one of the five original distilleries that comprised the Scottish Malt Distillers and its buildings went through a renovation in 1927. Through the 20th century, DCL continued operating the distillery until 1983 when St Magdalene permanently closed its doors along with another 8 of its operations. During the early 1990s, the distillery was then renovated into flats however its kiln and malting barn remain registered as listed C Grade buildings and therefore are still standing.