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Sell Your Cask of Balvenie Whisky

Sell your Cask of Balvenie Whisky with Mark Littler

Balvenie Cask Values & Valuations 

Do you own a cask of Balvenie single malt?  If you do you are one a very small number of people as very few casks of Balvenie have entered private ownership.  As a result the market for Balvenie casks is very strong and prices are high.  

More common than Balvenie is a whisky called Burnside – which is essentially a cask of Balvenie with a very minute amount (often a teaspoon) of Glenfiddich added.  This way the cask is no longer a single malt and the name can be changed accordingly.  Quite how this practice is allowed to continue we don’t know – but it may be that you own a cask of Burnside (aka Balvenie) as more of these have entered private hands.

Clearly, casks of Balvenie are more sought after as they are less common, but casks of Burnside can still fetch a good price.

We specialise in the brokerage of Balvenie casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Balvenie casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand.  Bourbon casks (quite common at Balvenie) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well. 

If you would like to know the value of your Balvenie cask use the form below to get in touch.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of Balvenie whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

How to sell your cask of Balvenie whisky

Do you own a cask of Balvenie single malt?  If you do you are one a very small number of people as very few casks of Balvenie have entered private ownership.  As a result the market for Balvenie casks is very strong and prices are high.  

More common than Balvenie is a whisky called Burnside – which is essentially a cask of Balvenie with a very minute amount (often a teaspoon) of Glenfiddich added.  This way the cask is no longer a single malt and the name can be changed accordingly.  Quite how this practice is allowed to continue we don’t know – but it may be that you own a cask of Burnside (aka Balvenie) as more of these have entered private hands.

Clearly, casks of Balvenie are more sought after as they are less common, but casks of Burnside can still fetch a good price.

We specialise in the brokerage of Balvenie casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Balvenie casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand.  Bourbon casks (quite common at Balvenie) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well. 

If you would like to know the value of your Balvenie cask use the form below to get in touch.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

What is my cask of Balvenie worth?

In order to provide you with an accurate valuation please provide as much of the below information as you can. There is more information about each section below the form.

Cask Whisky Valuation Form

The History of the Balvenie Distillery

The history of the Balvenie Distillery dates back to 1839 when William Grant was born in Dufftown. He started life as a cattle herder by the age of 7 and then became an apprentice shoemaker. He went onto become a clerk and then a bookkeeper at the Mortlach distillery in 1866, and this was where he finally became a manager, learning all about the whisky distilling trade.

20 years after starting work at the Mortlach distillery, Grant bought a field where he could build a distillery of his own close to Balvenie Castle. He designed plans and laid the foundations in 1886. He continued to take an active role in the Balvenie Distillery company until he died at the ripe old age of 83 in 1923.

The work began in 1892 to convert the Balvenie New House, a mansion dating from the 1700s into a whisky distillery. The process took 15 months to reach completion and it was not until 1893 that the very first distillation was produced. Although the Balvenie distillery was originally called Glen Gordon, it soon changed its name to match that of the ruined castle which stood beside it and which became its maltings.

This distillery primarily provided fillings for Grant’s Standfast blend, however in 1973, the first official bottling was produced. However, since it was still in demand by blended whisky producers, its ability to grow as a standalone brand was restricted. When Kininvie opened in 1990, these restrictions were slightly eased, however it was not until Ailsa Bay waenis built that greater amounts of stocks were made available. Today, the Balvenie distillery’s single malt is among the most rapidly growing single malt brands anywhere worldwide.

In 1993, this distillery was among the first to introduce a finished single malt, and its Double Wood was aged in ex-Bourbon casks and then finished in ex-sherry casks for extra flavour. This use of varying types of wood runs through the entire Balvenie range.

Balvenie’s whisky is very traditional, made with locally grown barley whenever possible which has been floor malted. ALthough Scotland has around a hundred distillers, Balvenie remains one of only 7 which still has a malting floor of its own. While its own floor maltings make up just a tiny percentage of the distillery’s total mash, it adds character to the whisky produced here.

Balvenie has only recently opened up to visitors who now come to see the big distillery with its 9 short necked stills which produce a honeyed, sweet character which is very different to the whiskies produced by Kininvie and Glenfiddich which share its site.