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Sell Your Cask of Clynelish Whisky

Sell your Cask of Clynelish Whisky with Mark Littler

Clynelish Cask Values & Valuations 

Clynelish is a distillery that has both a very high output and also a very strong following.  Lots of casks of Clynelish are in private ownership owing to various funding rounds.  Owing to its very close proximity and association with the Brora distillery Clynelish has a somewhat of a cult following.

Although there is always a steady stream of Clynelish casks on the market, prices remain high in respect to the quality of spirit produced by the distillery.

We specialise in the brokerage of Clynelish casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Clynelish casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand. Bourbon casks (quite common at Clynelish) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of Clynelish whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

How to sell your cask of Clynelish whisky

Clynelish is a distillery that has both a very high output and also a very strong following.  Lots of casks of Clynelish are in private ownership owing to various funding rounds.  Owing to its very close proximity and association with the Brora distillery Clynelish has a somewhat of a cult following.

Although there is always a steady stream of Clynelish casks on the market, prices remain high in respect to the quality of spirit produced by the distillery.

We specialise in the brokerage of Clynelish casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Clynelish casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand. Bourbon casks (quite common at Clynelish) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

What is my cask of Clynelish worth?

In order to provide you with an accurate valuation please provide as much of the below information as you can. There is more information about each section below the form.

Cask Whisky Valuation Form

The History of the Clynelish Distillery

Although the Clynelish Distillery achieved success, and for some it actually has a cult status in the whisky industry, this success was only born from human tragedy. As one of Scotland’s clearance distilleries, it emerged during the early 19th century when landowners moved tenant farmers forcibly from their lands in search of profits. Sutherland and Caithness bore the brunt of the clearances, with the Duke and Duchess of Sutherland being responsible for some of the most brutal activity of this time.

While some of the tenant farmers went overseas, others migrated to the Central Belt to new settlements where they ended up working for other business enterprises owned by the laird. The Duke of Sutherland had a number of businesses which he had established in Brora including a tile and brick works, salt panning, weaving and a coal mine, however the business we are most interest in is his whisky distillery – the Clynelish. The staff of the Clylelish Distillery were all one-time farmers who were only paid in a currency which could solely be redeemed in the company shops with all profits going to the Duke himself.

Although the distillery was unsuccessful at first, it started to develop a name for itself in 1896 when the Ainslie & Heilbron blenders purchased it in a partnership with John Risk. He became the distillery’s sole owner a few years later in 1912 and by the century’s end, Clynelish became a prized single malt.

Risk worked closely with John Walker & Sons and DCL, and Clynelish eventually folded into DCL at the same time as John Walker and Sons in 1925. Although it did shut down during the 1930s it did produce a small amount of whisky during the Second World War.

Like many other DCL distilleries, there was new construction during the 1960s, and a brand-new plant with 6 stills was constructed next to the distillery’s original buildings in 1968. Briefly, the old plant was mothballed for a year but then it started running in tandem with the new plant under the name Clynelish B. In 1969 it took the name Brora and started to produce a heavily peated spirit to be used for blends. Although this heavily peated phase continued until the early 1970s, after that the smoke was reduced and then it closed for good in 1983.

Meanwhile Clynelish has played a long term vital role with the John Walker & Sons brand. Its 14-year-old was launched originally under the Hidden Malts Diageo portfolio and a few years ago in 2014 a £30 million expansion of the Clynelish distillery was announced by owners Diageo, although so far these plans are still postponed.