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Sell Your Cask of Port Ellen Whisky

Sell your Cask of Port Ellen Whisky with Mark Littler

Port Ellen Cask Values & Valuations 

Port Ellen casks are arguably the most sought-after casks on the market.  Whenever casks appear records seem to tumble as everyone tries to get hold of this elusive spirit.  However, it may not be elusive for much longer…

In late 2017 Diagio announced that the Port Ellen distillery would be re-opened and new whisky would be produced ‘in carefully controlled quantities… replicating where possible the distillation regimes and spirit character of the original distilleries’.  Some think that this will drive down prices for Port Ellen, but given that the new spirit has to age for a minimum of three years (and most likely 10 years +) we are not going to see any ‘new’ Port Ellen on the market for a while yet.

We specialise in the brokerage of Port Ellen casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Port Ellen casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand. Bourbon casks (quite common at Port Ellen) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of Port Ellen whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

How to sell your cask of Port Ellen whisky

Port Ellen casks are arguably the most sought-after casks on the market.  Whenever casks appear records seem to tumble as everyone tries to get hold of this elusive spirit.  However, it may not be elusive for much longer…

In late 2017 Diagio announced that the Port Ellen distillery would be re-opened and new whisky would be produced ‘in carefully controlled quantities… replicating where possible the distillation regimes and spirit character of the original distilleries’.  Some think that this will drive down prices for Port Ellen, but given that the new spirit has to age for a minimum of three years (and most likely 10 years +) we are not going to see any ‘new’ Port Ellen on the market for a while yet.

We specialise in the brokerage of Port Ellen casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Port Ellen casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand. Bourbon casks (quite common at Port Ellen) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

What is my cask of Port Ellen worth?

In order to provide you with an accurate valuation please provide as much of the below information as you can. There is more information about each section below the form.

Cask Whisky Valuation Form

The History of the Port Ellen Distillery

Having been first opened in 1824, the Port Ellen Distillery was one of the later distilleries to open on the south coast of Islay. Constructed by Alexander Mackay, this Port Ellen site was built on an old malt mill which may have already been supplying the Oa Peninsula’s many illicit distilleries. Unfortunately, Mackay struggled in his venture, and so in 1836 the Port Ellen distillery’s lease was taken over from John Ramsay, a 21-year-old who had an uncle who was a distiller in Clackmannanshire.

Ramsay did not only establish the distillery, he also became business partners with the owner of Islay, Walter Frederick Campbell. The pair started up a bi-weekly steamer which plied the waters between Glasgow and the island and helped to cement the whisky industry’s success on Islay. It was also this development that made Port Ellen the main ferry terminal of the island instead of Bowmore.

The Ramsay family kept control of the distillery until 1920 when the Port Ellen Distillery Company, a newly formed organisation purchased it. This company had been started up by James Buchanan and John Dewar. It then merged with DCL five years later, and Port Ellen’s ownership fell into the hands of this giant of the whisky production industry. In 1930, it closed its doors for business and it was not until 1967 that it finally reopened once more – a fact that is often forgotten by fans of this brand.

The traditional distillery buildings found themselves dwarfed by the erection of brand new drum maltings in 1972 which were constructed alongside to supply the malt for the DCL’s 3 Islay Plants – Port Ellen, Lagavulin and Caol Ila. However, during the 1980s the excess whisky loch had a severe impact on Islay. Single malt had fallen out of favour and fewer major distillers were producing it.

Blenders required just a tiny amount of smoky malt for their products and this meant that many of Islay’s distilleries shut up shop. DCL, with its 3 distilleries, was much more exposed to the financial problems of this era and in 1983, it closed the doors of its Port Ellen operation for good. Now its stocks are starting to dwindle, and this has led to its prices rising.

Yet in 2017, plans were touted to reopen the Port Ellen distillery and, assuming planning permission is granted, its site is expected to come into operation once again by 2020.