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Sell Your Cask of Glenesk Whisky

Sell your Cask of Glenesk Whisky with Mark Littler

Glenesk Cask Values & Valuations 

Glenesk casks are very seldom seen on the market.  Private owners of Glenesk casks are even scarcer as most are retained by various distilleries.  This means that whenever a privately owned cask of Glenesk appears on the market there is mild hysteria.

Another one of the ‘silent’ distilleries, it can be said for certain that no Glenesk spirit will be made again as the site of the distillery is now a housing estate.  Given the distillery closed in 1985 any remaining casks must be at least 33 years old so checking the health of your Glenesk cask on a regular basis (by looking at regauge figures) is essential.

We specialise in the brokerage of Glenesk casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Glenesk casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand. Bourbon casks (quite common at Glenesk) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of Glenesk whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

How to sell your cask of Glenesk whisky

Glenesk casks are very seldom seen on the market.  Private owners of Glenesk casks are even scarcer as most are retained by various distilleries.  This means that whenever a privately owned cask of Glenesk appears on the market there is mild hysteria.

Another one of the ‘silent’ distilleries, it can be said for certain that no Glenesk spirit will be made again as the site of the distillery is now a housing estate.  Given the distillery closed in 1985 any remaining casks must be at least 33 years old so checking the health of your Glenesk cask on a regular basis (by looking at regauge figures) is essential.

We specialise in the brokerage of Glenesk casks and have buyers all over the world ready to put forward a no-obligation offer.

The most desirable Glenesk casks are fresh fill sherry oak casks, however, refill sherry casks are also in demand. Bourbon casks (quite common at Glenesk) do not command the same premium as sherry casks but can still sell well.

Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse
Mark Littler at the Glengoyne No.1 Warehouse

The process of selling a cask of whisky through Mark Littler

The process to get a no-obligation quote for your cask of whisky is easy.

  1. Send us details about your cask to [email protected]
  2. We receive offers from our clients
  3. We submit the best offer for your consideration

It really is as simple as that.  No catches, no obligations.  We are here to help you get the best deal.

What is my cask of Glenesk worth?

In order to provide you with an accurate valuation please provide as much of the below information as you can. There is more information about each section below the form.

Cask Whisky Valuation Form

The History of the Glenesk Distillery

Perhaps the most interesting thing about the Glenesk Distillery history is that it has had a huge number of names in its past. With a history that spans over 100 years, this distillery was established on a former flax mill’s site, and in 1897 is began its producing life under the name “Highland Esk”. Owned by James Isles, a spirit and wine merchant from Dundee, it was soon handed over to Septimus Parsonage, his business partner, due to a downturn in the market, and he only kept the distillery for 2 years before selling it on to J F Caille Heddle when it was renamed North Esk.

Throughout the First World War, the Glenesk Distillery stills remained silent, and then it was damaged by a fire so upon its reopening in 1919 at the end of the war it was only a maltings rather than a distillery. It was not until 1938 that whisky began to be produced again. It was at this time that it became part of the Associated Scottish Distilleries portfolio and they transformed it immediately into a grain distillery, naturally changing the name one more time to Montrose.

During World War II production temporarily ceased, and it did not start up again until 1953 when ASD withdrew from Scotch and the distillery joined the DCL portfolio. DCL ran Glenesk as a grain distillery intermittently for a decade, and then when other grain distilleries began to expand due to an increased demand for malt whisky during the 1960s, it was then changed back to a malt plant during 1964. As you may imagine, another name change was then on the cards, and the distillery became known as Hillside.

After four years, a large drums maltings was constructed next to the original building which underwent further expansion in 1973. For no apparent reason another name change occurred in 1980. This time it became known as Glenesk and this name lasted for five more years before the distillery finally closed its doors in 1985, before the site was eventually demolished and housing was built on it. Despite this, however, its maltings have continued and have even been expanded, now forming part of the Greencore Group.