WHAT IS A WHISKY CASK REGAUGE?

When you sell your cask of whisky we are going to require details from a regauge in order to value your cask.

This may sound like a technical nightmare but the reality is it is a very simple process for the distillery.  It is the equivalent of letting a buyer take a look under the bonnet of your car to check over the engine.

Here is everything you need to know about getting a regauge on your cask of whisky.

What is a regauge?

A regauge is a process whereby a distillery will measure exactly how much liquid remains in your cask.

Why is a regauge important?

Offers for you cask of whisky will be based on the number of litres of alcohol that remain in the cask

Most casks lose around 2% per year to the ‘angels’ through evaporation.  The amount of whisky that evaporates depends on the conditions of the warehouse and also the quality of the cooperage (well-made barrels tend to lose less alcohol).

How do I get a regauge?

Obtaining a regauge is a simple process – you simply need to call the distillery and request one.  It is a common procedure for the distillery to undertake.  They may charge you £25 per barrel.

What does a reguge tell me about my barrel?

A regauge will tell you two main things.

  1. How many bulk litres of spirit is in the barrel
  2. What percentage proof the spirit is – also called ABV (alcohol by volume)

Why do I need a regauge?

A regauge is essential as it tells us exactly what is in your cask.  It is the same as inspecting the engine in a car – two identical looking cars may have substantially different service histories and mileage, and obviously there would be a difference in price.

From the figures provided by a regauge you can work out the litres of alcohol that remain in the cask.  To do this simply multiply the bulk litres by the percentage of alcohol.

e.g. a cask with 150 bulk litres of alcohol at 62% contains 93 litres of alcohol.   

Why is the strength of the whisky important?

Once a cask of whisky drops below 40% ABV it can no longer be called whisky.  Casks that are close to this limit, say 41%, prove a risk and need to be bottled ASAP.  Left any longer and the entire value of the cask could be lost.

When you sell your cask of whisky we are going to require details from a regauge in order to value your cask.

This may sound like a technical nightmare but the reality is it is a very simple process for the distillery.  It is the equivalent of letting a buyer take a look under the bonnet of your car to check over the engine.

Here is everything you need to know about getting a regauge on your cask of whisky.

What is a regauge?

A regauge is a process whereby a distillery will measure exactly how much liquid remains in your cask.

Why is a regauge important?

Offers for you cask of whisky will be based on the number of litres of alcohol that remain in the cask

Most casks lose around 2% per year to the ‘angels’ through evaporation.  The amount of whisky that evaporates depends on the conditions of the warehouse and also the quality of the cooperage (well-made barrels tend to lose less alcohol).

How do I get a regauge?

Obtaining a regauge is a simple process – you simply need to call the distillery and request one.  It is a common procedure for the distillery to undertake.  They may charge you £25 per barrel.

What does a reguge tell me about my barrel?

A regauge will tell you two main things.

  1. How many bulk litres of spirit is in the barrel
  2. What percentage proof the spirit is – also called ABV (alcohol by volume)

Why do I need a regauge?

A regauge is essential as it tells us exactly what is in your cask.  It is the same as inspecting the engine in a car – two identical looking cars may have substantially different service histories and mileage, and obviously there would be a difference in price.

From the figures provided by a regauge you can work out the litres of alcohol that remain in the cask.  To do this simply multiply the bulk litres by the percentage of alcohol.

e.g. a cask with 150 bulk litres of alcohol at 62% contains 93 litres of alcohol.   

Why is the strength of the whisky important?

Once a cask of whisky drops below 40% ABV it can no longer be called whisky.  Casks that are close to this limit, say 41%, prove a risk and need to be bottled ASAP.  Left any longer and the entire value of the cask could be lost.

What is my cask worth?

In order to provide you with an accurate valuation please provide as much of the below information as you can. There is more information about each section below the form.

Cask Whisky Valuation Form